Selected Press & Essays

“He was a seriously playful artist. In his utopia, everyone would be having fun; no one would be left out.”
Johnson,Ken, “Review: Tseng Kwong Chi’s Darkly Comic Images at Grey Art Gallery,” New York Times, April 24, 2015

“He crafted an enigmatic persona and anarchic performance-based practice, and brought a devious and incendiary sense of humor to his highly sophisticated inquiry into the politics of representation.”
Ingrid Dudek, “Performing for the Camera: Tseng Kwong Chi,” ArtAsiaPacific Magazine, June 11, 2015

“Tseng’s rich body of work blended the permanence of photography with the more ephemeral performances of the East Village art scene.”
Karen Rosenberg, “Revisiting the Subversive Political Selfies of Tseng Kwong Chi, the Reagan Era’s Stephen Colbert,” Artspace, April 21, 2015

“Tseng’s actions [were] ‘paraperformative.’ That’s a complicated way of saying someone who is showing the truth of a situation by telling a lie. He is performing an identity that isn’t exactly his own, but that is revealing the truth of how people perceive identity.”
–Teresa Annas, “Tseng Kwong Chi: more than just a guy in a Mao suit,” The Virginian Pilot, September 2015

“He was, in real life, not a tourist but a cosmopolitan skilled at acclimating to new cultures.”
Ryan Wong, “How a Queer Asian Artist Infiltrated the New York Scene Through Dress-Up and Self-Portraiture,” Hyperallergic, May 5, 2015

“His passion was to impress upon us the illusive nature of perfection. From the grandeur of the Badlands to the serenity of a frosty canadian lake, he seduced us subliminally.”
Rob Goyanes, “Tseng Kwong Chi: Performing for the Camera”, The Miami Rail, Spring 2015

“Making a point of his Chinese-ness, Tseng appears as the mischievous ambassador of all outsiders, amplifying the cultural quiddity of both persona and monument through performance and melodrama. The result is compelling, civic, and eccentric at once.”
Kozyreva Sanchez, Cristina, “Tseng Kwong Chi,” ArtForum, November, 2014

“Tseng Kwong Chi was not only a photographer but a performance artist, provocateur, and documentarian who traversed the globe subversively exploring notions of cultural identity, perception and the role of the individual amidst iconic and sublime locations of the world…”
“Tseng Kwong Chi: Citizen of the World”, Wall Street International, November, 2014

“Tseng was – and remains, still, in the large-scale portraits shown at Ben Brown Fine Arts – a most classy flâneur of his generation, at once drawing exhibitionist attention to his Communist-era Eastern roots with the suit and yet coolly passive in his Western cinematic-era sunglasses.”
Cheung, Ysabelle, “Citizen of the World”, Time Out, November, 2014

“I think I’ve found my favourite exhibition in Hong Kong this year – it’s at the Ben Brown Fine Arts Gallery in the Pedder Building. When I walked in, I had no idea what to expect and I was blown away.”
“Tseng Kwong Chi at Ben Brown Art Gallery”, Bluebalu, December 19, 2014

“Tseng’s uniform endowed him with both respect and revulsion but also with an authenticity rarely questioned, primarily because there were not yet precedents for this particular formulation of an Asian stereotype… His own paparazzo, he cast himself as the ultimate tourist in the ultimate tourist snapshots, except they are technically superb, and meant to be, contradicting any idea of amateur endeavor.”
Wei, Lilly. Essay in Tseng Kwong Chi: Self-Portraits 1979-1989, Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York, NY, 2008.

“One of the central underpinnings of Tseng’s work is the Warholian conviction, shared with his better-known friends and contemporaries, that the artist is obliged to create more than the art itself—he must also clearly occupy a nexus of historical, critical, and ethical associations that provide the viewer with a contextual framework through which the art can be deployed to interpret the world around it.”
Cameron, Dan. Essay in Tseng Kwong Chi: Self-Portraits 1979-1989, Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York, NY, 2008.

“I knew Tseng a little, and he seemed to me a guy who went through life delighted. In the New York art world, the ‘80s had begun like a holiday. Galleries popped up with names like Fun, and night sites like Club 57 and the Pyramid mattered as much as regular art spaces. Tseng was at the heart of that world; permanently amused, he made holiday his work, and vice versa.”
– Frankel, David. “Tseng Kwong Chi,” Interview, April 2008.

“In one sense this work parodies tourist snapshots, and shows Tseng as a stranger in a land revealed to us, by his unexpected appearance in it, as itself strange. At the same time the pictures propose a tartly cynical conflation of the supposedly conflicting ideologies of East and West: where does the proletariat go when it takes a vacation? To the same places the bourgeoisie does.”
– Hagen, Charles. “Tseng Kwong Chi,” ArtForum, April 1984, pp. 79-80

“Even if Tseng enters on a press pass, he is suddenly among the revelers of the evening and participates among them like one of the exotic emissaries who frequented the courts of Europe in the eighteenth century… as both ambassador and reporter.”
– Martin, Richard, Curator, The Costume Institute, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, “One Raiment Night: Tseng Kwong Chi at the Party of the Year,” 1996.

“His robotic posture, inspired by Warhol’s notion of the artist as a machine, became a form of performance art set on a glorious world stage. Whether striking a fashionable pose at Notre Dame, diplomatically greeting an astronaut at Cape Canaveral or reverently approaching Mount Rushmore, Tseng looks both in and out of sync with his surroundings. There is no clear answer as to what he is doing there.”
– Laster, Paul, “Suitable Attire Required,” Art AsiaPacific, cover and article, Fall 2004

Press Releases

Tseng Kwong Chi: Performing for the Camera
The Shirley and Alex Aidekman Arts Center, Tufts University, January 21 – May 22, 2016

Tseng Kwong Chi: Ambiguous Ambassador 1979 – 1989
Carroll and Sons Art Gallery, Boston, January 8 – February 27, 2016

Tseng Kwong Chi: Performing for the Camera
Chrysler Museum of Fine Art, Norfolk, VA,  August 18 – December 13, 2015

Tseng Kwong Chi: Performing for the Camera
Grey Art Gallery, New York University, April 21 – July 11, 2015

Tseng Kwong Chi: Citizen of the World
Ben Brown Fine Arts, Hong Kong, November 20, 2014 – January 24, 2015

Tseng Kwong Chi: Body Painting with Keith Haring and Bill T. Jones
Paul Kasmin Gallery, February 11 – March 27, 2010